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Spoiler Heavy Review of IT (2017)

My fandom of Stephen King and his adaptions is complicated by the sheer volume of his work. King has written some of my favorite books of all time (Pet Semetary and The Stand) and others I can barely believe I read five pages through.


However, no matter what I or anyone might say, King is an unescapable fixture in the world of 20th century and 21st century literature. Most of the people I've ever met have read at least one of his books and I generally find it's a good sign if a person has read a bunch of them.
"IT," in particular, occupies a special place in my mind. It was one of the first adult books I read as a kid - way back in the summer of sixth grade at summer camp. I didn't understand all of it on a conscious level but experienced it on a deeper, emotional level. The story of a gang of 'losers,' desperately trying to survive in the face of indifferent adults, hostile bullies, and a monstrous clown made a great deal of sense to me. As in, I didn'…
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Thoughts on Promontory and "A Breath from the Sky"

Last month, my story "Promontory" appeared in Martian Migraine's "A Breath from the Sky" anthology. Promontory concerns a college president, Joseph Serrick, and his attempt to die in a way he could live with. At some point in the past, Serrick became the host for an ancient and possible extraterrestrial parasitic colony, their puppet in matters concerning the world surrounding a small forked lake in Upstate New York. I wrote the story as a reaction to a very real college president I'll leave unnamed here, who in addition to fostering a toxic environment for decades at the university he presided over, was a student of Immanuel Kant.


The paradox of a person dedicated to the philosophy of benevolence and self-agency also being a petty and tyrannical boss got me thinking about writing a mythos style story. Initially, the president character was meant to be the behind-the-scenes villain, seen only in the last few paragraphs of the story. But the story, at least i…

The Case for Darwin, NT

The stars aligned this year and allowed me a chance to visit my brother and his family in the Top End. Mostly this trip was my chance to see my two nephews and catch up with my brother and sister-in-law. However, another part of the trip was a sincere interest in the town in which they live: Darwin. 

I'm going to venture a guess and say that you might not often spare a thought for this city. In the modern era I can think of only three reasons it may have come to your attention: 1) It is the capitol city of the Northern Territories and the largest city on the northern coast of that great continent (although largest is truly a relative term here) 2) It was in a few scenes of Australia, that historical epic a few years back starring Nicole Kidman and Hugh Jackman 3) It's the site of a small contingent of US Marines stationed in the Pacific Rim as part of the Asian Pivot initiated by President Obama.

Darwin was destroyed four separate times in its history: thrice by cyclones and on…

Dunkirk and Valerian

I'll start with Dunkirk even though it was the second movie I saw this weekend.

Dunkirk made a strong claim for the movie of the year for me. Similar to Fury Road from a couple years back, this is an exercise in sustained action and tension. Its story, although cleverly folded up within three time frames, is remarkably straight forward. The characters in the movie are either trying to get off Dunkirk beach before it is overrun by Germans in 1940 or they are trying to help those attempting to leave. This basic story is told through three threads, land, sea, and air as essentially anonymous characters work to survive. Other than a few blurry shadows and the strafing of dive-bombers, the human enemies are not pictured on screen. It is rather nature itself: water, wind, fire, and steel which closes in on the characters, snuffing out one life after another. A reoccurring image is the screen filling with water, as though the camera gives the audience the POV of impersonal, crushing doom.

Wrapping up "Agent Shield and Spaceman"

After more than a year, it's finished!

I started "Agent Shield and Spaceman," last year after listening to another writer talk about the rewards and challenges of self-publishing a novel. I got excited about the possibility of telling a complete story one chapter at a time, releasing it to the public, and telling the story I wanted to tell.

I can without reservation say the experience was rewarding for me personally. I've gotten into a nice pattern of writing short stories, submitting them, and seeing a few published. But to be in charge of the process from word go has been incredibly liberating and also terrifying. The best of "Agent Shield" is also the best of me as a writer and I hope at least some of what I've written has diverted and entertained you.

So, what's next?

I definitely intend to collect all of the chapters together for an e-book edition of the novel. I'd probably sell it through Amazon or Smashmouth, we'll see what sort of ho…

Story Announcement!

I'm overjoyed to announce that my story "Machinery of Ghosts," will be appearing in the Gehenna & Hinnom "Transhuman SF" anthology! "Machinery of Ghosts" is a SF thriller set in a decaying space station in the grip of a nano-technological cold war. Thank you to C.P. Dunphey for giving this story the perfect home! (https://gehennaandhinnom.wordpress.com/our-authors/accepted-stories-for-transhuman-sf-anthology-thus-far/)


I've also got another acceptance to announce in the not-so-distant future but I'd like to wait until we're a bit closer to the publishing date before I talk about that.
Also, in publishing news, August will see the release of my story "Promontory" in the "A Breath from the Sky" anthology from the Martian Migraine Press. I'm hoping to make the book release party at Providence, RI's Necronomicon. Hope to see you there!

July Review Grab Bag

After looking over my notes on a few prospective Ancient Logic posts I realized that I am hopelessly behind schedule. The current WIP and the web fiction I write, "Agent Shield and Spaceman," have taken up almost all of the energy I usually devote these 'side projects.'

Anyway, in the past couple of months, I saw (in order of recall) Wonder Woman and Spiderman at the theaters, Magicians, American Gods, and the current season of Preacher on the small screen, and finished reading Kim Stanley Robinson's New York 2140. The last item will get its own review but here are some quick thoughts on the others: 

Wonder Woman: This remains my favorite superhero flick this year. Yes, Guardians was a lot of fun and Spiderman (which I'll get to) was one of my favorite recent Marvel films, but in terms of consequence, and meaning, and shear mythological epic-ness, Wonder Woman takes the cake. As others have noted, some of this impact surely comes from how little the typical f…